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Claiming to be IRS and an arrest warrant has been issued. Total BS the IRS will never call you.
If you get this call ask for a name and badge number is 800-829-1040.
 Aug 11th, 2017
Phone Scams a Serious Threat; Remain on the IRS “Dirty Dozen” List of Tax Scams for 2017

 Aggressive and threatening phone calls by criminals impersonating IRS agents remain a major threat to taxpayers, headlining the annual "Dirty Dozen" list of tax scams for the 2017 filing season, the Internal Revenue Service announced today.

During filing season, the IRS generally sees a surge in scam phone calls that threaten police arrest, deportation, license revocation and other things. The IRS reminds taxpayers to guard against all sorts of con games that arise at any time and pick up during tax season.

"Don't be fooled by surprise phone calls by criminals impersonating IRS agents with threats or promises of a big refund if you provide them with your private information," said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. "If you're surprised to get a call from the IRS, it almost certainly isn't the real IRS. We generally initially contact taxpayers by mail."

The Dirty Dozen is compiled annually by the IRS and lists a variety of common scams taxpayers may encounter any time during the year. Many of these con games peak during filing season as people prepare their tax returns or hire someone to do so.

The Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) reports they have become aware of over 10,000 victims who have collectively paid over $54 million as a result of phone scams since October 2013.

"Everyone can share the word about scam phone calls-- just hang up and don't engage these people," Koskinen said. “Despite recent successes against phone scam artists, these scams constantly evolve and people need to remain vigilant. We’d like to thank law-enforcement, tax professionals, consumer advocates, the states, other government agencies, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration and many others for helping us continue this fight and protect taxpayers."

How do the scams work?

Scammers make unsolicited calls claiming to be IRS officials. They demand that the victim pay a bogus tax bill. They con the victim into sending cash, usually through a wire transfer or a prepaid debit card or gift card, like an iTunes card. They may also leave “urgent” callback requests through phone “robo-calls,” or via a phishing email.

Many phone scams use threats to intimidate and bully a victim into paying. They may even threaten to arrest, deport or revoke the driver’s license of their victim if they don’t get the money.

Scammers often alter caller ID numbers to make it look like the IRS or another agency is calling. The callers use IRS employee titles and fake badge numbers to appear legitimate. They may use the victim’s name, address and other personal information to make the call sound official.

The IRS also reminded taxpayers today that scammers change tactics. Aggressive and threatening phone calls by criminals impersonating IRS agents remain a major threat to taxpayers, but variations of the IRS impersonation scam continue year-round and they tend to peak when scammers find prime opportunities to strike.

Here are some things the scammers often do but the IRS will not do. Any one of these five things is a tell-tale sign of a scam.

The IRS will never:

Call to demand immediate payment using a specific payment method such as a prepaid debit card, gift card or wire transfer. Generally, the IRS will first mail  a bill to any taxpayer who owes taxes.Threaten to immediately bring in local police or other law-enforcement groups to have the taxpayer arrested for not paying.Demand that taxes be paid without  giving  the taxpayer the opportunity to question or appeal the amount owed.Ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.

For taxpayers who don’t owe taxes or don’t think they do:

Do not give out any information. Hang up immediately.Contact TIGTA to report the call. Use their “IRS Impersonation Scam Reporting” web page. Alternatively, call 800-366-4484.Report it to the Federal Trade Commission. Use the “FTC Complaint Assistant” on FTC.gov. Please add "IRS Telephone Scam" in the notes.

For those who owe taxes or think they do:

Call the IRS at 800-829-1040. IRS workers can help.

Stay alert to scams that use the IRS as a lure. Tax scams can happen any time of year, not just at tax time. For more, visit “Tax Scams and Consumer Alerts” on IRS.gov.

Each and every taxpayer has a set of fundamental rights they should be aware of when dealing with the IRS. These are your Taxpayer Bill of Rights. Explore these rights and the agency’s obligations to protect them on IRS.gov.
Massachusetts
 May 02nd, 2017
This is a VERY sophisticated scam... NOT the typical heavy accent, you're going to jail if you don't pay" scam call from India (Kolkata).

Call the number back and you get very professional-sounding automated instructions (an American voice). They even direct you to the legitimate IRS Website for more information. The telephone line is identified as the "IRS refund hotline".

The tip-off that this is a scam comes about 2 minutes into the call. The automated voice instructs you to provide your social security number and refund amount... IRS would NEVER ask for this information over the phone. If you put in some numbers, they read them back to you, then disconnect. Guess what... they now have enough information to file a phony tax return (or amended return), and steal your refund... this year or next.

Don't fall for the scam !!!

Other telephone number associated with this scam is 800-829-1954.

Again, this is a very professional and successful scam, probably being run out of USA (Russian "mafia" suspected).
California
 Oct 07th, 2016
This is a scam... below is from the IRS website if you want to report it:
IR-2014-84, Aug. 28, 2014
WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service issued a consumer alert today providing taxpayers with additional tips to protect themselves from telephone scam artists calling and pretending to be with the IRS.
These callers may demand money or may say you have a refund due and try to trick you into sharing private information. These con artists can sound convincing when they call. They may know a lot about you, and they usually alter the caller ID to make it look like the IRS is calling. They use fake names and bogus IRS identification badge numbers. If you don’t answer, they often leave an “urgent” callback request.
“These telephone scams are being seen in every part of the country, and we urge people not to be deceived by these threatening phone calls,” IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said. “We have formal processes in place for people with tax issues. The IRS respects taxpayer rights, and these angry, shake-down calls are not how we do business.”
The IRS reminds people that they can know pretty easily when a supposed IRS caller is a fake. Here are five things the scammers often do but the IRS will not do. Any one of these five things is a tell-tale sign of a scam. The IRS will never:
Call to demand immediate payment, nor will we call about taxes owed without first having mailed you a bill..

Demand that you pay taxes without giving you the opportunity to question or appeal the amount they say you owe.

Require you to use a specific payment method for your taxes, such as a prepaid debit card.

Ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.

Threaten to bring in local police or other law-enforcement groups to have you arrested for not paying.
If you get a phone call from someone claiming to be from the IRS and asking for money, here’s what you should do:
If you know you owe taxes or think you might owe, call the IRS at 1.800.829.1040. The IRS workers can help you with a payment issue.

If you know you don’t owe taxes or have no reason to believe that you do, report the incident to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) at 1.800.366.4484 or at www.tigta.gov.
Florida
 Sep 19th, 2016
BS
Illinois
 Sep 09th, 2016
IRS Audit Scam
Maryland
 Aug 31st, 2016
Automated message and only the second half of the message recorded (the first half must have been running while our outgoing message on the answering machine was running). The message said that for more information about this case file (which apparently was the cut off part), we were to call the number 315-277-2295. Other websites have noted that the caller claims to be calling from the IRS and that the IRS is suing. One person commented that the IRS does not call about such things--they send letters. This is true. Our taxes were messed up a few years ago (because of an IRS issue with one of our names) and we were unable to file them properly so they were repeatedly rejected by the IRS. It wasn't until the IRS sent a letter saying we owed taxes that we were able to get the issue straightened out (well, kind of--enough that we can file our returns). They don't call you, they send you a letter. The main number for the IRS is 800-829-1040 and they have local tax payer offices where you can go for face-to-face help. The number above is NOT the number for a local IRS office in New York.

This is a scam.
Etch2
 Jan 04th, 2016
J. Russell George Urges Taxpayers to Be on "High Alert" to Phone Fraud Scam
TIGTA Reminds Taxpayers to Beware of Calls from IRS Impersonators this Filing Season

WASHINGTON — As the 2015 tax filing season begins, the Treasury Inspector General for Taxpayer Administration (TIGTA) is reminding taxpayers to beware of phone calls from individuals claiming to represent the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) in an effort to defraud them.

“It is critical that all taxpayers continue to be wary of unsolicited telephone calls from individuals claiming to be IRS employees,” said J. Russell George, Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration. “This scam, which is international in nature, has proven to be the largest scam of its kind that we have ever seen. The callers are aggressive, they are relentless and they are ruthless,” he said. “Once they have your attention, they will say anything to con you out of your hard-earned cash,” George added.

TIGTA has received reports of roughly 290,000 contacts since October 2013 and has become aware of nearly 3,000 victims who have collectively paid over $14 million as a result of the scam, in which individuals make unsolicited calls to taxpayers fraudulently claiming to be IRS officials and demanding that they send them cash via prepaid debit cards.

“The increasing number of people not only receiving but accepting these unsolicited calls from individuals who fraudulently claim to represent the IRS is alarming,” George said. “At all times, and particularly during the tax filing season, we want to make sure that innocent taxpayers are alert to this scam so they are not harmed by these criminals,” he said, adding, “Do not become a victim.”

“This is a crime of opportunity, so the best thing you can do to protect yourself is to take away the opportunity,” the Inspector General added. “Do not engage with these callers. If they call you, hang up the telephone.”

Inspector General George noted that the scam has hit taxpayers in every State in the country. Callers claiming to be from the IRS tell intended victims they owe taxes and must pay using a pre-paid debit card or wire transfer. The scammers threaten those who refuse to pay with immediate arrest, deportation or loss of a business or driver’s license.

The IRS usually first contacts people by mail – not by phone – about unpaid taxes. And the IRS won’t ask for payment using a pre-paid debit card or wire transfer. The IRS also won’t ask for a credit card number over the phone.

“If someone unexpectedly calls claiming to be from the IRS and uses threatening language if you don’t pay immediately, that is a sign that it really isn’t the IRS calling,” George said.

The callers who commit this fraud often:

Utilize an automated robocall machine.
Use common names and fake IRS badge numbers.
May know the last four digits of the victim’s Social Security Number.
Make caller ID information appear as if the IRS is calling.
Send bogus IRS e-mails to support their scam.
Call a second or third time claiming to be the police or department of motor vehicles, and the caller ID again supports their claim.

If you get a call from someone claiming to be with the IRS asking for a payment, here’s what to do:

If you owe Federal taxes, or think you might owe taxes, hang up and call the IRS at 800-829-1040. IRS workers can help you with your payment questions.
If you don’t owe taxes, fill out the “IRS Impersonation scam” form on TIGTA’s website, www.treasury.gov/tigta or call TIGTA at 800-366-4484.
You can also file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission at www.FTC.gov. Add “IRS Telephone Scam" to the comments in your complaint.
John Doe
 Jul 01st, 2015
THE FIRST TIME THEY CALLED THEY ASKED FOR ME BY MY FIRST NAME AND THEN HUNG UP. CALLED AGAIN AND HUNG UP WHEN I ANSWERED. CALLED THIRD TIME AND AGAIN THEY HUNG UP WHEN I ANSWERED. THIS IS VERY ANNOYING AND AM GETTING TIRED AND VERY ANGRY AT THESE IDIOTS
PJS
 Jan 08th, 2015
Actually got called from 204-304-5230. Message was left on recorder stating that the IRS was filing a lawsuit against me and that I needed to call (210) 418-5062 to discuss the case against me. This is a SCAM! The IRS does not leave calls like this. If a person is concerned about the call, they should check directly with the IRS, 1 800-829-1040. I read that a person can report scam calls claiming to be from the IRS or the Treasury Department to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration at 1-800-366-4484 or at www.tigta.gov.
Anonymous
 Nov 19th, 2014
Received call from this number. Message left on recorder stating that the IRS was bringing a lawsuit against me and that I needed to call a different number back 210-418-5062). This is a SCAM. The IRS never leaves calls like this on a person's recorder. If you get a call like this and are truly concerned, then look up the true phone number for the IRS and call them, 1 800-829-1040. I read that you can report scam calls claiming to be from the IRS or the Treasury Department to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration at 1-800-366-4484 or at www.tigta.gov.
Anonymous
 Nov 19th, 2014
Scam. IRS sends letters.
Colorado
 Oct 09th, 2014
Scam, IRS doesn't call, they send letters.
South Dakota
 Sep 12th, 2014
Got call from 800-829-1040 and caller left message saying he was Officer ......unintelligible....with the US Treasury Department, and for me to call back at 305-507-4268. Obviously a Hindu man trying UNSUCESSFULLY to disguise his bad accent. Of course this is a scam, I have no intention to return the call and give these idiots more fuel to bug me. I have no business with the US Treasury that need to be discussed. Getting fed up with these scammers.
ozzie XT
 Jul 31st, 2014
Fake IRS call. The caller left a rude and a threatening message on the voicemail. DO NO believe this call. If you have questions, please call IRS directly at 1 800-829-1040.
KR
 Feb 21st, 2014
IRS Warns of Pervasive Telephone Scam
Versión en español
IRS YouTube Video:
Tax Scams: English | Spanish | ASL
IR-2013-84, Oct. 31, 2013
WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today warned consumers about a sophisticated phone scam targeting taxpayers, including recent immigrants, throughout the country.

Victims are told they owe money to the IRS and it must be paid promptly through a pre-loaded debit card or wire transfer. If the victim refuses to cooperate, they are then threatened with arrest, deportation or suspension of a business or driver’s license. In many cases, the caller becomes hostile and insulting.

“This scam has hit taxpayers in nearly every state in the country. We want to educate taxpayers so they can help protect themselves. Rest assured, we do not and will not ask for credit card numbers over the phone, nor request a pre-paid debit card or wire transfer,” says IRS Acting Commissioner Danny Werfel. “If someone unexpectedly calls claiming to be from the IRS and threatens police arrest, deportation or license revocation if you don’t pay immediately, that is a sign that it really isn’t the IRS calling.” Werfel noted that the first IRS contact with taxpayers on a tax issue is likely to occur via mail
Other characteristics of this scam include:
Scammers use fake names and IRS badge numbers. They generally use common names and surnames to identify themselves.
Scammers may be able to recite the last four digits of a victim’s Social Security Number.
Scammers spoof the IRS toll-free number on caller ID to make it appear that it’s the IRS calling.
Scammers sometimes send bogus IRS emails to some victims to support their bogus calls.
Victims hear background noise of other calls being conducted to mimic a call site.
After threatening victims with jail time or driver’s license revocation, scammers hang up and others soon call back pretending to be from the local police or DMV, and the caller ID supports their claim.
If you get a phone call from someone claiming to be from the IRS, here’s what you should do:
If you know you owe taxes or you think you might owe taxes, call the IRS at 1.800.829.1040. The IRS employees at that line can help you with a payment issue – if there really is such an issue.
If you know you don’t owe taxes or have no reason to think that you owe any taxes (for example, you’ve never received a bill or the caller made some bogus threats as described above), then call and report the incident to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration at 1.800.366.4484.
If you’ve been targeted by this scam, you should also contact the Federal Trade Commission and use their “FTC Complaint Assistant” at FTC.gov. Please add "IRS Telephone Scam" to the comments of your complaint.
Taxpayers should be aware that there are other unrelated scams (such as a lottery sweepstakes) and solicitations (such as debt relief) that fraudulently claim to be from the IRS.
The IRS encourages taxpayers to be vigilant against phone and email scams that use the IRS as a lure. The IRS does not initiate contact with taxpayers by email to request personal or financial information. This includes any type of electronic communication, such as text messages and social media channels. The IRS also does not ask for PINs, passwords or similar confidential access information for credit card, bank or other financial accounts. Recipients should not open any attachments or click on any links contained in the message. Instead, forward the e-mail to phishing@irs.gov.

More information on how to report phishing scams involving the IRS is available on the genuine IRS website, IRS.gov.
You can reblog the IRS tax scam alert via Tumblr.

Follow the IRS on New Media
Subscribe to IRS Newswire
Immigrant
 Feb 19th, 2014
I received a call from someone claiming to be with the IRS from this number and she asked for my SSN. I declined and said she'd have to mail me a notice about whatever she was calling about. A few days later I received a letter from IRS (specifically, their Automated Collection System). It gave 800-829-7650 as the number I should call. I was still suspicious. I spent a significant amount of time speaking with the IRS, after calling them at their 800-829-1040 number. Eventually I was transferred to a representative with the IRS Automated Collections System. The number 800-829-7650 is the number for the IRS ACS Support, and it IS A LEGIT NUMBER FOR THE IRS. You can safely call this number. It turned out mine was a case of mistaken identity and was told to pitch the letter.
ZA
 Oct 08th, 2009
SCAM. The automated message came in to my work number, not a number that is on any of my IRS documentation. Also, I am pretty sure I don't owe a thing and verified that with my partner. I called the legitimate IRS and they cannot look anything up by a case number. Also, because I am curious, I dialed the number that was given in the VM and they wanted my SS, which I did not provide, they looked up the case number and made some excuse about this being a mistake.

They were SUPER helpful - too helpful. I don't believe that IRS employees are that happy/helpful and the ones I talked to after calling the 1-800-829-1040 published IRS number were a little grumpy. More in line with what I would expect. The 1-800-829-1040 IRS rep said they thought it was a scam and wanted to know if I had received anything in the mail; which I have not. THEN, they were really surprised to hear that I had been contacted at work.
jf
 Sep 25th, 2009
I believe this number is legitimate. I was worried when I read the comment posted by MB, so I also called the 1-800-829-1040 number. Although the IRS agent I spoke with didn't know that extension, sheconfirmed that I had been called by another IRS agent on the night I received the call giving me this number.

The agent said she thought the IRS controlled all the 800-829-XXXX numbers. If it was a scam, I think it might have been a completely different number (e.g., 1-900-...)
John
 Sep 02nd, 2009
Got a call from someone claiming to be IRS, asked for my SS#, I refused to give and asked for a way to verify that the caller was from the IRS. Caller gave me the number 800-829-7650. I called number and was asked by automatic machine to enter SS#. I hung up and called the known IRS phone number 800-829-1040) and they claimed it was a scam, that the IRS will never ask for your SS#.
MB
 Jul 09th, 2007

20 Comments